Categories
Pain and Inflammation Reduction

Galactic Gravy Episode 9 – Reversing Autoimmune Disease with Olivia Alaniz [Video]

This is audio from a podcast recorded June 14, 2021 on the topic of personal experience dealing with autoimmune disorder. (Linked below)My name is Olivia Alaniz. I am a 22-year-old Dayton, OH-born Mexican American woman. I currently work in funeral service as a funeral director & embalmer apprentice. I love supporting this field by taking great care of bereaved families during such a sensitive time in their lives; each day is very different, and through my daily experiences, I grow more empathetic and responsible in how I treat others and myself.Outside of my workplace, I enjoy spending time with my family, writing poetry, cooking, and studying a variety of topics including anatomy & physiology, linguistics, and music. The reason why I decided to do this talk with Misty Brown is because I feel it my duty to share my story of healing. Whether I help others to find peace & remedy or just to vocalize my personal narrative, I am very grateful to have received this invitation to express myself. Misty has shared with me the story of how her sister fell ill and eventually died due to complications of autoimmune disease & the associated methods of treatment. After years spent experimenting and studying my own natural history, I feel more confident than ever before on how to better process information in order to comfortably assimilate into my changing environment, digest food & conversation & events, and to listen into my biological being from a systematic /and/ wholistic (holistic) approach while simultaneously nurturing the psyche of my true spirit. I fell ill about seven years ago, around 2014, at the age of 16, due to a multitude of factors, I believe, mainly associated with my environment and lifestyle. In the months leading up to my first visits with our longtime family doctor, a D.O. whom I had not seen for any health-related problems nor routine check-ups in over five years, I was increasingly becoming physically & psychologically unstable, no longer able to sufficiently cope or manage myself without assistance, nearly to the point of disability. The manifestation of my illness didn’t happen one-day-to-the-next but rather through a gradual degradation. At the time of our first visit, I presented signs of major physical & emotional fatigue and digestive problems; alongside, some minor skin reactions and hair-pattern changes. I expressed symptoms of severe depression, anxiety, head-to-toe joint pain, digestive distress (loose stool), skin irritation, and generalized weakness and fatigue. Remembering now how I felt then, I was filled with crippling fear and pain, wishing death upon myself, yet at the same time, praying to survive in hopes of living well someday. Initially diagnosed with Hypothyroidism, a condition defined by low thyroid gland-function (detection of insufficient thyroid hormone), two years afterward, at 18 years old, I was diagnosed with the autoimmune condition Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis following the discovery of high-levels of antibodies within my thyroid gland tissue.Many sorts of tests were administered; including countless blood sampling, urine & stool tests, endoscopy procedures, physical & psychiatric examination, and much more. All the while, I found both disturbance and relief in embracing new identities while letting go of others. The methods of treatment attempted by me & my family have included, but are not limited to, the enhancement of the quality of our food (diet), use of (native) natural herbs, homeopathic medication, prescription medication, chiropractic & massage treatment, energy work, talk therapy & self-expression (art, journaling….), and physical exercise (yoga, Tai Chi, Kung Fu, CrossFit….). I have my mother to thank for supporting me so well throughout this challenging time. I do not wish to imagine what would have happened to me had I not had her nearby to hold my hand and lead the way throughout the years filled with confusion, fear, frustration, pain, and sorrow. Together, we ventured into the dark, and with great determination, curiosity, and love, we found the light of our dreams—true wellness. Today, I live to promote freedom & security. I place great intention where I see fit, and I will continue to stray away from operating through means of violence & suffering. I want to help others to think and feel that healthy-living is not only achievable but can also be obtained in simple, easy ways.Find listed contact information, artwork, and services of Misty Brown.Here is how you find my stuff: Misty BrownGalactic Gravy Facebook discussion group: https://www.facebook.com/galacticgravy1111Galactic Gravy Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/galacticgravyThe Rainbow Collaborative: https://rainbowcollaborative.com/Wellspring Healing Studio: https://www.facebook.com/wellspringhealingstudioLove Shack Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/loveshackdaytonCosmic Creations Art Page: https://www.facebook.com/Cosmic-Creations-111528997338598

Categories
Epilepsy News

Olfactory System: Anatomy and Physiology, Pathways, Animation. [Video]

(USMLE topics) Olfaction: A&P of special senses – sense of smell; loss of smell – anosmia; clinical significance. This video is available for instant download licensing here: https://www.alilamedicalmedia.com/-/galleries/narrated-videos-by-topics/anatomy-physiology-basics/-/medias/e218e86b-4798-4486-878e-222c6628470e-olfactory-system-narrated-animation©Alila Medical Media. All rights reserved. Voice by : Marty HenneSupport us on Patreon and get early access to videos and free image downloads: patreon.com/AlilaMedicalMedia The olfactory system is responsible for the sense of smell, or olfaction. Basically, airborne molecules emitted by an odorant source are detected by olfactory sensory neurons located at the roof of the nasal cavity. These neurons convert chemical stimuli into electrical signals and send them via the olfactory nerve to the olfactory bulb, then to the brain, where they are interpreted as odors.Odorant molecules are first dissolved in the mucus secreted by the olfactory epithelium, which guides them to the cilia of olfactory neurons. This is where odorant molecules bind to their receptors. Each neuron expresses a single type of protein receptor. There are only about 400 different receptors in humans, but they are used in a combinatorial way such that one odorant can bind several receptors, and one receptor can bind several odorants. This enables the olfactory system to recognize an enormous number of odorants.Odorant receptors are G protein-coupled. Upon binding to the odorant, a signaling cascade is activated, leading to membrane depolarization. When the olfactory stimulus is strong enough, action potentials are generated and conducted along the axon to the olfactory bulb. The axons of all olfactory sensory neurons form the olfactory nerve, also known as cranial nerve I. In the olfactory bulb, these axons synapse with second-order neurons – the mitral and tufted cells, within structures called glomeruli. Each glomerulus receives axons from sensory neurons that express the same protein receptor. The second-order neurons are stimulated by sensory neurons, but they also receive inhibitory feedback from the cerebral cortex. This means an odor can be perceived differently under different circumstances. For example, the smell of food is more appealing when one is hungry, and is less so when one is full.The axons of mitral and tufted cells form the olfactory tracts, which project directly to the primary olfactory cortex. The primary olfactory cortex is not one but several cortical areas located on the base of the frontal lobe and inferior surface of the temporal lobe. These primary regions then project further to some other areas of the brain, mediating different aspects of odor recognition and response. Because olfactory neurons are exposed directly to the noxious external environment, they are replaced more often than other neurons. Stem cells in the epithelium differentiate into new olfactory neurons, whose axons grow along the existing axons to the olfactory bulb. Any factors that destroy all olfactory neurons at once would result in permanent loss of sense of smell, a condition known as anosmia. Illnesses that cause inflammation of the nasal mucosa may lead to transient anosmia. Loss of smell also affects the taste experience, as taste and smell are the 2 aspects of flavor.The ability to smell decreases with normal aging, but anosmia is also an early sign of several neurodegenerative disorders. Because epileptic seizures often originate from the brain area associated with the olfactory cortex, seizures are often preceded by hallucinations of disagreeable odors. All images/videos by Alila Medical Media are for information purposes ONLY and are NOT intended to replace professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always seek the advice of a qualified healthcare provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition.

Categories
Epilepsy News

Bile Pathways and the Enterohepatic Circulation, Animation [Video]

Bile composition, synthesis pathways, primary and secondary bile acids and bile salts, and enterohepatic recirculation. This video is available for instant download licensing here: https://www.alilamedicalmedia.com/-/galleries/images-videos-by-medical-specialties/metabolism/-/medias/0eaf9e83-6990-4e95-bf6c-4568912ced55-bile-pathways-and-the-enterohepatic-circulation-narrated-animatVoice by: Ashley Fleming©Alila Medical Media. All rights reserved.Support us on Patreon and get early access to videos and free image downloads: patreon.com/AlilaMedicalMediaAll images/videos by Alila Medical Media are for information purposes ONLY and are NOT intended to replace professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always seek the advice of a qualified healthcare provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition.Bile is a yellowish-green fluid secreted by the liver. Bile contains bile acids or bile salts, cholesterol, phospholipids, bilirubin, electrolytes and water. Bile acids are essential for digestion and absorption of fats and fat-soluble vitamins in the small intestine. Bile is also the major route by which cholesterol, as well as bilirubin, a byproduct of red blood cell breakdown, are eliminated from the body.Bile acids are synthesized from cholesterol via several pathways. The synthesis occurs mainly in the liver. The primary bile acids produced by the liver include cholic acid, CA, and chenodeoxycholic acid, CDCA. These primary bile acids are then combined with the amino acids glycine or taurine, forming conjugated bile acids, which are secreted into bile ducts. Bile flows into the small intestine to aid with digestion. Outside mealtimes, it is diverted to the gallbladder for concentration and storage. Following food intake, the presence of fats and proteins in the duodenum – the first segment of the small intestine – stimulates the secretion of the enteric hormone cholecystokinin. Cholecystokinin induces the gallbladder to contract and release bile to the small intestine. In the intestine, microorganisms of the gut microbiota chemically modify the primary bile acids, converting them into secondary bile acids. The bacteria also de-conjugate some of the bile acids.While passing through the intestine, bile acids help with digestion of fats. They act as a detergent, breaking large globules of fat into smaller micelles, making them more accessible to lipase. Bile acids are also critical for transport and absorption of the fat-soluble vitamins. About 95% of the bile acids delivered to the duodenum are reabsorbed back into blood. Some unconjugated and uncharged bile acids are passively absorbed along the intestine, but most of the conjugated bile salts are actively transported through the cells of the ileum – the last segment of the small intestine. The small amount that is excreted in feces is compensated for by newly synthesized bile acids in the liver. Intestinal cells (enterocytes) send the reabsorbed bile acids back to the liver via the portal vein. In the liver, most of the bile acids are extracted from the hepatic circulation for reuse. Only a small portion escapes to the systemic circulation. Thus, bile acids can be recycled many times a day between hepatocytes in the liver and enterocytes in the intestine. This recycling circuit is known as enterohepatic circulation, or recirculation.